Buy Passion Flower For Insomnia, Depression and Other Benefits

Passion Flower – Passiflora incarnata

COMMON NAME
Passion flower

LATIN NAME
Passiflora incarnata

FAMILY
Passifloraceae

PART USED
Whole herb

DESCRIPTION
A perennial vine, the passion plant grows up to 33 feet long. Its leaves are alternate, serrate, and downy. The flowers have pinkish white petals, green-and-white sepals, white-and-purple inner corollas, and thick stigmas. Fruits are orange berries with many seeds and yellow pulp.

HABITAT
Passion flower is indigenous to tropical and subtropical areas of the Americas. It is cultivated throughout the world.

FOLKLORE AND TRADITIONAL USES
The name “passion flower” was given to the plant by Jacomo Bosio, a 17th-century monastic scholar, who considered the appearance of various species as representative of the elements of the Christ’s crucifixion. The 72 corona filaments stood for the number of thorns in the crown; the 5 stamens, the 5 wounds; the petals, the 10 true apostles; and the spotted leaf underside, the 30 silver pieces paid to Judas to betray Jesus. Upon discovering the flower, Spanish explorers in Peru saw the flower as a sign of divine approval of their actions. In Peru, New Spain, and the West Indies, descendants of the Spanish explorers still call it the “flower of the five wounds.”

MEDICINAL USES
Folk remedies have used this herb to treat depression, insomnia, and hemorrhoids. An approved sedative in Germany, it is employed today to treat nervous agitation and mild insomnia. It’s mild sedative and spasmolytic properties are attributed to its flavonoids and alkaloids; especially harmalas, which inhibit oxygen consumption by the brain. These compounds are also thought to decrease circulatory and respiratory rates by reducing arterial pressure. Some consider its alkaloids, harmine and harmaline, effective against Parkinson’s disease. Other Passiflora species contain constituents that act against molds, yeasts, and bacteria.